Native American Adoption, Captivity, and Slavery in Changing Contexts


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Physical Description x, p. Published New York : Palgrave Macmillan, c Language English View all editions Prev Next edition 3 of 3. Other Authors Carocci, Max.

Pratt, Stephanie, Edition 1st ed. Slave trade -- North America -- History.

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Indian captivities -- North America -- History. Adoption -- North America -- History. Contents Machine generated contents note: ch. Jeter ch. Bowne ch.


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View online Borrow Buy Freely available Show 0 more links None of your libraries hold this item. Found at these bookshops Searching - please wait We were unable to find this edition in any bookshop we are able to search. Throughout the war, she acted as a spy, passing intelligence about the movement of colonial forces to British forces, while providing shelter, food and ammunition to loyalists.

When they ended up on the losing side, Molly and her family fled for Canada, where she and other loyalists established the town of Kingston.

After the war, the British paid her a pension for her services. Originally from Liverpool, England, Anne sailed to America at the age of 19, after both her parents died.

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She eventually married a veteran frontiersman and soldier named Richard Trotter and settled in Staunton, Virginia. Richard, who joined the Virginia militia as tensions between frontiersmen and Native Americans grew, was killed in the Battle of Point Pleasant, West Virginia in late With rifle, hunting knife and tomahawk in hand, Anne became a scout and messenger recruiting volunteers to join the militia and sometimes delivering gunpowder to the soldiers. She couriered messages between Point Pleasant and Lewisburg, West Virginia—a mile journey on horseback.

Her most famous ride took place in After soldiers at Fort Lee got word that the Native Americans were planning to attack, and discovered that their gunpowder supply was desperately low, Anne galloped to the rescue. She rode the miles to Lewisburg, where she switched horses, loaded up with gunpowder and rode back to Fort Lee. Anne remarried to John Bailey, a member of the Rangers, a legendary group of frontier scouts, in As the group worked to defend new settlements from Native American attacks, Mad Anne once again used her skills as a scout and courier.

Daniel Boone rescuing his daughter Jemima from the Shawnee, after she and two other girls were abducted from near their settlement of Boonesboro, Kentucky. His daughter Jemima earned her own spot in the history books on July 14, Demonstrating their own knowledge of frontier ways, the quick-witted teens left trail markers as their captors took them away—bending branches, breaking off twigs and leaving behind leaves and berries.

Native American Slaves: Historians Uncover an Overlooked, Chilling Chapter in U.S. History

Their rescue team, led by Daniel Boone himself, took just two days to follow the trail and retrieve the girls. The rescuers included Flanders Callaway, Samuel Henderson and Captain John Holder, each of whom later married one of the kidnapped girls. This event became such an integral part of frontier lore, author James Fenimore Cooper included it in his classic novel The Last of the Mohicans. Born in or in what is now Idaho, Sacagawea was a member of the Lemhi band of the Native American Shoshone tribe.

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At the age of 12, she was kidnapped by a war party of Hidasta Indians enemies of the Shoshone and taken to their home in Hidatsa-Mandan villages, near modern-day Bismarck, North Dakota. Around , Sacagawea , along with other Shoshone women, was sold as a slave to the French-Canadian fur trader Toussaint Charbonneau.

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She soon became pregnant, giving birth to son Jean-Baptiste Charbonneau in February Meanwhile, after the U. After more than a year of planning and initial travel, the expedition reached the Hidatsa-Mandan settlement. When a squall nearly capsized a vessel they were traveling in, Sacagawea was the one who saved crucial papers, books, navigational instruments, medicines and other provisions, while also managing to keep herself and her baby safe. Sacagawea died at the age of 25, not long after giving birth to a daughter.

Native American Adoption, Captivity, and Slavery in Changing Contexts

Clark became legal guardian to both her children. Settlement on the Santa Fe Trail. While a woman named Susan Shelby Magoffin is often credited as the first white woman to travel the Santa Fe Trail, Mary Donoho made the trek 13 years prior. Leaving Independence, Kentucky in , Mary and her husband, William Donoho, headed to Santa Fe, bringing along their 9-month-old daughter. Together, the Donohos created La Fonda, an inn for travelers at the end of the trail.

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It was here that Mary gave birth to two more of her five children—all of whom she eventually outlived. Later in the 19th century, with the allotment of land to Native Americans, women are given pieces of property that they owned in their own right. Narcissa Whitman, who was killed during the Whitman Massacre.

Believed to be one of the first two white women to cross the Rocky Mountains on foot, Narcissa Whitman left behind accounts of her life as a missionary in the Oregon territory with her prolific letters home to her family in New York State. She, her husband and others were killed by Indians in a savage attack on the mission.

Soon after marrying Marcus Whitman, a physician and fellow missionary in , they left for Oregon Country and settled in what would later become Walla Walla, Washington.

Native American Adoption, Captivity, and Slavery in Changing Contexts Native American Adoption, Captivity, and Slavery in Changing Contexts
Native American Adoption, Captivity, and Slavery in Changing Contexts Native American Adoption, Captivity, and Slavery in Changing Contexts
Native American Adoption, Captivity, and Slavery in Changing Contexts Native American Adoption, Captivity, and Slavery in Changing Contexts
Native American Adoption, Captivity, and Slavery in Changing Contexts Native American Adoption, Captivity, and Slavery in Changing Contexts
Native American Adoption, Captivity, and Slavery in Changing Contexts Native American Adoption, Captivity, and Slavery in Changing Contexts
Native American Adoption, Captivity, and Slavery in Changing Contexts Native American Adoption, Captivity, and Slavery in Changing Contexts
Native American Adoption, Captivity, and Slavery in Changing Contexts Native American Adoption, Captivity, and Slavery in Changing Contexts

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