Color in the Classroom: How American Schools Taught Race, 1900-1954


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Color in the classroom : how American schools taught race, - Semantic Scholar

As they translated theories into practice, teachers crafted an educational discourse on race that differed significantly from the definition of race produced by scientists at mid-century.

Color in the Classroom pbk - Zoe Burkholder - Häftad () | Bokus

Schoolteachers and their approach to race were put into the spotlight with the Brown v. Board of Education case, but the belief that racially integrated schools would eradicate racism in the next generation and eliminate the need for discussion of racial inequality long predated this. Discussions of race in the classroom were silenced during the early Cold War until a new generation of antiracist, "multicultural" educators emerged in the s.

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Contempt and Pity. Daryl Michael Scott. Sheldon Ekland-Olson. The Ethnic Project. Vilna Bashi Treitler. The A List. Jay Carr. Why America Needs a Left. Eli Zaretsky. Black Conservative Intellectuals in Modern America. Michael L. Renewing Black Intellectual History. Adolph Reed. Race and Ethnicity: The Basics. Peter Kivisto. In her first chapter, Burkholder describes the European categorizations of race and racism within white American society.

She frames race Authors: Amy A. Hunter and Matthew D. Date: Jan. These insights are significant to understanding the dynamic and challenging process of reforming the construction of race through public schools. Burkholder marshals evidence to draws strong correlations to the shift in race conceptualization induced through scholarly publications and collaborations between scholars, teachers, and national organizations.

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Color in the Classroom: How American Schools Taught Race, 1900-1954 Color in the Classroom: How American Schools Taught Race, 1900-1954
Color in the Classroom: How American Schools Taught Race, 1900-1954 Color in the Classroom: How American Schools Taught Race, 1900-1954
Color in the Classroom: How American Schools Taught Race, 1900-1954 Color in the Classroom: How American Schools Taught Race, 1900-1954
Color in the Classroom: How American Schools Taught Race, 1900-1954 Color in the Classroom: How American Schools Taught Race, 1900-1954
Color in the Classroom: How American Schools Taught Race, 1900-1954 Color in the Classroom: How American Schools Taught Race, 1900-1954
Color in the Classroom: How American Schools Taught Race, 1900-1954 Color in the Classroom: How American Schools Taught Race, 1900-1954

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